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I'm a salesman, average height, average build. Like most people in modern society I probably have a little more body fat than I really should. I can't run marathons, I've never so much as picked up a sword let alone wielded one, and strangely enough I can't seem to cast spells no matter how many Latin sounding words I scream at the top of my lungs. This is why I play RPGs. I don't want to be a salesman I want to be a warrior, or a mage, I want to be able to crush my enemies by wiggling my little finger at them, or wielding a sword I probably couldn't even lift in real life. In short, I play RPGs to feel powerful. Escapism.

Having just completed a playthrough of Early Access, I have to say that it feels like I'm role playing myself. At no point did I feel powerful, at no point did I feel I could crush my enemies or turn them into a pile of goo. I felt like I had no skill in my chosen profession, like I was an Accountant who woke up one morning and decided my new job would be as a hired sword. I don't feel this way in any other RPG, but in this I spend most of my time swinging a sword and wildly missing the target, it's as if my character has never picked one up before. When I cast a spell, I feel like I'm throwing a wet paper towel my opponent, and since I'm stupid enough to walk into a battle wearing dressing gown rather than suit of armour, I feel like I'm a liability, especially since every sleep spell that hits me puts me out like I've been on a weekend bender. I walk up to a two foot tall impish creature, I swing a sword almost as long as I am tall, it comes crashing down on their head doing a monstrous... 1 damage, and the biggest injury this pitiful creature in front of me risks is putting its back out because of how hard he's laughing at me. In short, at no point during my playthrough did I feel powerful.

Larian, please fix this. I want to feel like I have the power of a Minotaur, not a Milkman.

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If you expect to feel "powerfull enough to crush your enemies or turn them into a pile of goo" at level 1 ...
You probably didnt play many RPG before. O_o

Where, or how would you like to continue if starting power level would be set like this?


I liked original spellcasting system more ... frown

Anyway ... i cast Eldritch Blast!
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That feeling would be the motivation to reacher high levels and it enables the reward of feeling powerful when you do.

Also.. team work.

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Encounters are all designed to be challenging and if you don't use Larian's cheese (and don't know much about D&D), the game can be a pain from the beginning to the end.

The difficulty curve is not really interresting and you never really have the feeling you're powerfull...
Except when you're able to kill every monsters with a single character, which require to use the god mode.

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I don't know- if tomorrow I decided to pick up a sword and wear my motorcycle riding gear as armor I doubt I'd fair very well against the easier encounters at first either.
But, by level 3, being able to lay waste to an entire goblin camp, lay low a Hag, and defeat a Githyanki scouting party ... yeah, I'd feel pretty bad ass.

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It's not just because you're low level. The game is not as balanced as it should be.

But, that said, D&D is not about going around hacking and slashing everything as if it is easy to do. It is about strategy and tactics. It is about growing and increasing power over time so you can face bigger and more powerful monsters.

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Originally Posted by RagnarokCzD
If you expect to feel "powerfull enough to crush your enemies or turn them into a pile of goo" at level 1 ...
You probably didnt play many RPG before. O_o

Where, or how would you like to continue if starting power level would be set like this?

It's called scaling and I was likely playing cRPGs before you were born. I'm not talking about being a god, walking in to the goblin camp and wiping the floor with the lot of them, I'm talking about this game adhering far too close to D&D rules than is good for a cRPG to be doing. Those rules might work well in a pen and paper setting but they do not work on a PC. I'm talking about my character being able to hit the target more often than not. I'm talking about being able to build my character how I want to build it. If I want to build a tank I should be able to take points out of dexterity and sink them into strength and constitution. I can't. I'm talking about getting attribute points to spend each level, not once a blue moon. I'm talking about this game having everything that made every cRPG to be released in the last 20 years, great. This game has none of it. In my opinion, if it's released with it's current inability to hit, it will be an abject failure. Oh it'll sell well because the access media will lap it up and gloss over the issues like they always do, but steam hours sunk into this game will be non-existent, steam reviews will pan it. Why? Because no one wants to play a game where you miss most of your time.

Originally Posted by Maximuuus
Encounters are all designed to be challenging and if you don't use Larian's cheese (and don't know much about D&D), the game can be a pain from the beginning to the end.

It adheres to D&D rules at the expense of playability. Those rules might be great in a pen and paper setting, they're lousy for a video game. Larian need to strike a balance between D&D rules and playability for a casual, non-D&D audience. Those of us who are used to RPGs were battles are fun and flowing. Let me give you an example. A fight against the Drow boss. My party has bless, Gale has full, 100% health. The boss hits him with a spell doing 100% damage and putting him out of the fight. It's not like I can get him up because the AI targets the character with the least HP and puts them back down before they can take a health potion or be healed. How will that be fun to your average gamer?

Another example is sleep spells put Gale to sleep 100% of the time. It never misses. It does with other characters but never fails to put him to sleep. What use is a Wizard who can be put out of the fight in a single hit? It's about my party having bless and hitting a Goblin for 5 damage, then the same Goblin hitting me for 15. With only 28 health that's more than 50% damage in a single hit, and that's the beginning of the round. How is that in any way fun for your average gamer who's never played D&D?

Originally Posted by GM4Him
It's not just because you're low level. The game is not as balanced as it should be.

But, that said, D&D is not about going around hacking and slashing everything as if it is easy to do. It is about strategy and tactics. It is about growing and increasing power over time so you can face bigger and more powerful monsters.

Exactly my point, the game is not close to being balanced. I know it's Early Access but the balance really shouldn't be so wildly unbalanced. Even with strategy and tactics its unbalanced. I can get behind a character and still only have a 50% chance of hitting it. What? I'm fighting Goblins etc., not Jedi masters.

When it comes to spell casting it's also the fact that it's the number of times you can use the limited in the number of spells you have available doubles the penalties for missing. I get one shot with a lvl 2 spell and if I miss, that's my spell casters power diminished. If I had larger pool of spells or more spell slots or if the game used a mana analogue that could be replenished with potions, like every other RPG in the history of RPGs in video gaming, if the AI didn't hit you so often so hard, harder than you do with a critical, then missing would not be so big a problem. As it stands now, if you miss, it's a problem. A big one.

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Yeah, a lot of us have been suggesting more balance. I don't agree that D&D rules can't work for a cRPG, but the balance is off on BG3. I am currently writing posts using BG3 story in a tabletop to show how this game should be using actual 5e rules. It works. The game would be more balanced and more fun. No rules or mechanics I am using would fail in a video game. They can all translate to PC.

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Originally Posted by Chief_Jericho
Originally Posted by Maximuuus
Encounters are all designed to be challenging and if you don't use Larian's cheese (and don't know much about D&D), the game can be a pain from the beginning to the end.

It adheres to D&D rules at the expense of playability. Those rules might be great in a pen and paper setting, they're lousy for a video game. Larian need to strike a balance between D&D rules and playability for a casual, non-D&D audience. Those of us who are used to RPGs were battles are fun and flowing. Let me give you an example. A fight against the Drow boss. My party has bless, Gale has full, 100% health. The boss hits him with a spell doing 100% damage and putting him out of the fight. It's not like I can get him up because the AI targets the character with the least HP and puts them back down before they can take a health potion or be healed. How will that be fun to your average gamer?

Another example is sleep spells put Gale to sleep 100% of the time. It never misses. It does with other characters but never fails to put him to sleep. What use is a Wizard who can be put out of the fight in a single hit? It's about my party having bless and hitting a Goblin for 5 damage, then the same Goblin hitting me for 15. With only 28 health that's more than 50% damage in a single hit, and that's the beginning of the round. How is that in any way fun for your average gamer who's never played D&D?

No it doesn't adhere to the TT.
TT players will correct me if I'm wrong but according to my little knowledge of 5e (and every encounter builder I tried / video I watched) :

- You're not fighting against 15 goblins at the same time in the TT at level 3.
- You'll never fight 2 minotaurs at level 4 and those minotaurs don't have 3 attacks/round and/or cannot jump to reach your Gale 50m away.
- You never fight against Flind + gnolls at level 4.
- You never fight a spectator + 5 drow at level 4.
- You'll never fight 4 githyanki warriors at level 4.
- You',ll never fight 3 ogres at level 3 or 4.
- 4 harpies with level 3 characters is a deadly encounter, especially with this verticality and the advantage/disadvantage from highground.
- Recaps, yuan-ti,...
- Ennemies won't focus your Gale and you're not going to enter a loop dead/help/dead/help/dead/...
- Sleep is based on dice to determine the number of HP that's gonna sleep... Meaning your gale won't alwayd fall asleep / more than 1 creature could fall asleep...

Nothing here adhere to D&D and those encounters in the TT would be absolutely deadly.
Of course Larian has tried to "rebalance" those creatures but they did a poor job and combats are not representative at all of D&D.

Exemple : they reduced the harpy's HP so they increased their AC and their dexterity = you have to hit less often but... you miss more often... Great ! Did they consider we would enjoy missing more ?


Every encounters can be deadly if you're unlucky enough in the TT but in BG3 combats are just too hard for players that don't use all OP Larianism and too easy for players that regularly use them.

These OP mechanics unbalance everything and create a lot of frustration and/or repetitiveness in combats.
These problems comes from Larian's design decisions / monsters rebalance or choices. Not from the source material.

D&D combats in video games :
- are tactical
- makes you feel powerfull
- can be challenging
- aren't frustrating if you know a bit about the rules (modifiers, increase your %to hit,...which require tutorials)
- can be balance
- are fun

BG3 combats are often frustrating, are too easy and/or too hard depending if you're using "Larian's creativity" or if you're thinking "inside Larian's box", are repetitive because they always require to use the same tactics and they aren't balanced or tactical at all.

This is NOT because of D&D. Keep that in mind and if you don't believe me... try Solasta (and close your eyes during cutscenes^^).
Combats in this game probably aren't perfect for a wider audience but it's far better than what we have in BG3... and this is because of D&D.

Last edited by Maximuuus; 10/05/21 02:32 PM.
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Originally Posted by Maximuuus
BG3 combats are often frustrating, are too easy and/or too hard depending if you're using "Larian's creativity" or if you're thinking "inside Larian's box", are repetitive because they always require to use the same tactics and they aren't balanced or tactical at all.

This is NOT because of D&D. Keep that in mind and if you don't believe me... try Solasta (and close your eyes during cutscenes^^).
Combats in this game probably aren't perfect for a wider audience but it's far better than what we have in BG3... and this is because of D&D.

So now you're agreeing with me that the game has serious balance issues that need to be addressed urgently? I've never played D&D, apart from NVN twenty odd years ago but I don't remember combat being as unfun as it is in BG3. Every time I've complained about the balance issues the line trotted out is "it's adhering to D&D rules" which is why I said what I said. Where the blame lies doesn't really concern me, so long as it gets fixed. I can give you another two examples of the serious imbalance of the game.

In this first example, I'll ask you a question: Should a Goblin be able to push a troll off a ledge when I can't push a worg off one?

In a fight I had earlier today this happened, I tried every pushback spell and ability and nothing would dislodge that Worg, but a 3 foot Goblin was able to push a 3 meter troll off on its first go.

In the second example, using Lae'zel I sneaked past the guards, came up behind a Goblin still hidden and had a low percentage (25% I think it was) to hit. Predictably I missed. This is why I made the quip about fighting Jedi Masters. Do Goblins have preternatural reflexes? Do they have eyes in the back of their heads? Standing behind someone unnoticed should convey a 100% hit chance so I don't want to hear any more rubbish about tactics because even when you use tactics the game punishes you for it.

For Spellcasters the constant missing is compounded by the fact you only get to cast one rank two spell per rest period because not even short rests regenerate that, they don't even fully heal you, they only do a percentage. This makes being a Wizard that you really don't want close enough to be using melee, a total waste of a character slot. This is why every other cRPG in the last twenty years has used a resource like Mana that can be replenished with the use of potions, and have different spells use different percentages. Would that be in line with D&D? Probably not but only your enthusiasts will care, your average gamer will not. Whatever mechanic is used, spellcasters must be able to cast more than one high level spell per rest period, and short rests should regenerate it.

The bottom line is as you say, BG3 combat is not fun, not even close, and this needs to be urgently addressed and the focus of the next patch before any consideration is given to more classes or story.

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There definitely are serious balance issues that need to be addressed. But many of us are arguing that the problem isn't 5e rules, it's the combo of 5e rules + homebrew decisions that Larian has added. Many of these changes remove much of the tactical decision making from 5e combat, removing synergy from the different classes and turning combat into more of a 'hack and slash'. However, such hack and slash games need to have higher chances to hit to be fun (feel like a superhero) and make up for the loss of tactical thinking. Larian should fully commit to one side or the other.

Originally Posted by Chief_Jericho
In the second example, using Lae'zel I sneaked past the guards, came up behind a Goblin still hidden and had a low percentage (25% I think it was) to hit. Predictably I missed. This is why I made the quip about fighting Jedi Masters. Do Goblins have preternatural reflexes? Do they have eyes in the back of their heads? Standing behind someone unnoticed should convey a 100% hit chance so I don't want to hear any more rubbish about tactics because even when you use tactics the game punishes you for it.
You should almost never have only 25% to hit in this game. Lae'zel has a Strength of 17, giving her a +5 to-hit on melee attacks. In order to only have a 25% chance to hit, you need to be attacking an enemy with 15AC and have disadvantage on the attack roll. Lae'zel doesn't have darkvision, so it makes sense that she would be ineffective at fighting while in the dark (mechanically, this would give Disadvantage to hit ~ 25% penalty; you should use lights or characters with darkvision for sneaking in the dark), but being hidden should grant Advantage on the attack to counteract the Disadvantage...

Did you take the Great Weapon Master feat for Lae'zel? If so, this reduces chances to hit by 25% (in exchange for increased damage) which would explain why your to-hit is so low. Turn that off (in your reactions bar) for higher chances to hit.

Originally Posted by Chief_Jericho
For Spellcasters the constant missing is compounded by the fact you only get to cast one rank two spell per rest period because not even short rests regenerate that, they don't even fully heal you, they only do a percentage. This makes being a Wizard that you really don't want close enough to be using melee, a total waste of a character slot. This is why every other cRPG in the last twenty years has used a resource like Mana that can be replenished with the use of potions, and have different spells use different percentages. Would that be in line with D&D? Probably not but only your enthusiasts will care, your average gamer will not. Whatever mechanic is used, spellcasters must be able to cast more than one high level spell per rest period, and short rests should regenerate it.

The bottom line is as you say, BG3 combat is not fun, not even close, and this needs to be urgently addressed and the focus of the next patch before any consideration is given to more classes or story.
BG3 combats seem to be balanced around taking a long rest every ~2 fights. Long rest frequently and you'll be able to use your powerful spells more often. At level 3, Wizards have 4 first-level spell slots and 2 second-level spell slots. That's 6 leveled-spells split between 2 combats, which is a fair amount considering that combats last ~4-10 rounds, and this only gets better with higher levels and more spell slots. Warlocks get less spell slots but these do recharge on short rest.

Also, damaging/buffing spells are almost always better than healing spells in D&D 5e. This is a known feature/issue.

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I had always agreed about the poor balance of the game.

As many other here, I'm really worried about combats. I'm one of those that try to understand and after many monthes thinking, discussing, learning D&D, trying the game... It obviously comes from Larian's encounter design "philosophy".

Not sure about "a troll" but there are rules to push creatures in D&D and they aren't the same in BG3.

The size matter in D&D. I have to admit that I don't know exactly how it works in BG3 but I'm sure it's not the samee. Here are 3 issues in BG3 :

- in D&D it's an action. Pushing is meaningfull because if you miss you won't attack. You use it wisely, it's not something you use if you don't have better to do with your bonus action (if you have one, you don't always have bonus action in D&D).
- in D&D you push for 1m, not 4. It's not that easy to push creatures in hole. In BG3 it's close to a win button.
- in BG3 if you're hidden (not invisible...), you have 100% to push... Even if you're a goblin pushing a giant.

In D&D attacking someone that can't see you gives an advantage. To have an advantage you usually have to be creative, use synergies between characters, think about a specific tactic. In BG3 advantages are everywhere.

Not sure why it hasn't work in your exemple because you can have an advantage in BG3 as soon as you're in someone's back even if his eyes are open and if he see you turning arround (but hey, it's a turn based game so they're frozen !!)

You'll have more spellslots with your casters at higher levels and your cantrip will scale to be more powerfull. Spellslots is a part of the tactical value of D&D. You have to use them wisely rather than burning everything at every combats.
Of course combats have to be balanced, and they aren't.
This is something else they completely miss and the spellslots system is reduced to nothing interresting.

Again, this is not about D&D's rules. This is all about BG3's combat balance/design (and the resting mechanic).

Last edited by Maximuuus; 10/05/21 04:55 PM.
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Originally Posted by mrfuji3
There definitely are serious balance issues that need to be addressed. But many of us are arguing that the problem isn't 5e rules, it's the combo of 5e rules + homebrew decisions that Larian has added. Many of these changes remove much of the tactical decision making from 5e combat, removing synergy from the different classes and turning combat into more of a 'hack and slash'. However, such hack and slash games need to have higher chances to hit to be fun (feel like a superhero) and make up for the loss of tactical thinking. Larian should fully commit to one side or the other.

Like I said I was just repeating what I'd been told in a number of other threads. What I think Larian need to focus on is not making a D&D game, but making a fun game that's in the D&D setting. A lot of players will buy this on the back of DOS2 which is arguably (is imo) the finest RPG ever made and are going to be sorely disappointed. If the combat in this game was on par with the combat in DOS2 we'd have a masterpiece on our hands. Sadly it's not even close.

Originally Posted by mrfuji3
BG3 combats seem to be balanced around taking a long rest every ~2 fights. Long rest frequently and you'll be able to use your powerful spells more often. At level 3, Wizards have 4 first-level spell slots and 2 second-level spell slots. That's 6 leveled-spells split between 2 combats, which is a fair amount considering that combats last ~4-10 rounds, and this only gets better with higher levels and more spell slots. Warlocks get less spell slots but these do recharge on short rest.

It's not that I don't understand that, it's that I don't agree with that decision. Look, we have a perfect storm right now of a lack of spells, a limit of how often spells can be used, and a high miss percentage. For example, it's a good idea that frost ray (or whatever it's called) does less damage than Fire in exchange for slowing the character but if you miss and then can't cast it again in the fight it's neither use nor ornament. At least a fighter who misses can always swing an axe again. At level 4 you get a cantip or ability or something that allows for the spells to be replenished, but then Larian made it so it can only be used out of combat and only regenerates one Rank 2 spell. Larain has made combat magic worthless which means Gale is worthless and most players will never play a wizard. The mechanics surrounding how magic works in this game needs a major rethink before this game is released. They simply aren't fit for purpose in their current guise.

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Originally Posted by Maximuuus
I had always agreed about the poor balance of the game.

As many other here, I'm really worried about combats. I'm one of those that try to understand and after many monthes thinking, discussing, learning D&D, trying the game... It obviously comes from Larian's encounter design "philosophy".

Not sure about "a troll" but there are rules to push creatures in D&D and they aren't the same in BG3.

The size matter in D&D. I have to admit that I don't know exactly how it works in BG3 but I'm sure it's not the samee. Here are 3 issues in BG3 :

You misunderstand my point. My point isn't that a Goblin shouldn't be able to push a Troll into a pit, it's that if they can, a human Fighter (so high strength) should be able to push a worg off a beam. My point is that the rules of the game are not consistently applied between player and AI which is causing huge balance issues. As I've said for a while now, the AI rarely misses, the player rarely hits. Why? Because the rules are not applied consistently. If this game goes live with this combat system it's DOA, it's as simple as that.

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Originally Posted by Chief_Jericho
Like I said I was just repeating what I'd been told in a number of other threads. What I think Larian need to focus on is not making a D&D game, but making a fun game that's in the D&D setting. A lot of players will buy this on the back of DOS2 which is arguably (is imo) the finest RPG ever made and are going to be sorely disappointed. If the combat in this game was on par with the combat in DOS2 we'd have a masterpiece on our hands. Sadly it's not even close.
I agree. Making a fun game is the most important thing. With the caveat that it has to be recognizably D&D; otherwise it's incredibly misleading to use the name brands of Baldur's Gate and D&D. Selling yugioh cards advertised as magic the gathering cards is scummy, even if both are (arguably) fun games.

Originally Posted by Chief_Jericho
It's not that I don't understand [resting mechanics and spell slots], it's that I don't agree with that decision. Look, we have a perfect storm right now of a lack of spells, a limit of how often spells can be used, and a high miss percentage. For example, it's a good idea that frost ray (or whatever it's called) does less damage than Fire in exchange for slowing the character but if you miss and then can't cast it again in the fight it's neither use nor ornament. At least a fighter who misses can always swing an axe again. At level 4 you get a cantip or ability or something that allows for the spells to be replenished, but then Larian made it so it can only be used out of combat and only regenerates one Rank 2 spell. Larain has made combat magic worthless which means Gale is worthless and most players will never play a wizard. The mechanics surrounding how magic works in this game needs a major rethink before this game is released. They simply aren't fit for purpose in their current guise.
Cantrips can be cast again freely. Casting a cantrip is a caster's version of swinging an axe. They both cost no resources and have the same chances of hitting, assuming equal stats.

Edit: For leveled spells, I agree with you. The combination of more difficult encounters (encouraging either cheese or spending lots of spells), the ease of long resting (~free), and the relative reduction of utility spells' worth due to easy advantage+other abilities/consumables, and the ease of losing concentration due to surfaces all harm combat enjoyability. E.g., in 5e I would spend a spell slot to use Bless and be happy with my turn, but in BG3 it's just so much better to spam attacks.

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Cantrips, like basic attacks for martial classes, get upgraded at level 5 and can then do an extra damage die (or in the case of Eldritch Blast, be used to attack again with all the riders that accompany each Eldritch Blast attack). They are meant to be a constant part of a Caster's role in combat, being something they can do instead of spending a spell slot.

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Originally Posted by Chief_Jericho
Originally Posted by Maximuuus
I had always agreed about the poor balance of the game.

As many other here, I'm really worried about combats. I'm one of those that try to understand and after many monthes thinking, discussing, learning D&D, trying the game... It obviously comes from Larian's encounter design "philosophy".

Not sure about "a troll" but there are rules to push creatures in D&D and they aren't the same in BG3.

The size matter in D&D. I have to admit that I don't know exactly how it works in BG3 but I'm sure it's not the samee. Here are 3 issues in BG3 :

You misunderstand my point. My point isn't that a Goblin shouldn't be able to push a Troll into a pit, it's that if they can, a human Fighter (so high strength) should be able to push a worg off a beam. My point is that the rules of the game are not consistently applied between player and AI which is causing huge balance issues. As I've said for a while now, the AI rarely misses, the player rarely hits. Why? Because the rules are not applied consistently. If this game goes live with this combat system it's DOA, it's as simple as that.

You can push the worg. You missed, but it's possible. The "numbers/calculcation" may be the issue. As I said I don't know exaclty how it works because there are nothing in the log.
Strenght help to push but it's not significant and you can't have advantage on this... Not sure but I guess you can in the TT.

About the balance between players and AI I don't know about your exemples.
To be honnest I don't think I'm missing more than the AI but just like yours, this comment is only based on observations, not on evidence.

But yes there are huge differences between the players / the AI. To give you a few facts :

- The AI won't often dip their weapons, you can do it all the time as a bonus action.
- The AI won't shove you often, you can do it as a bonus action.
- The AI is very bad to backstab your characters, players backstab at every turns.
- The AI won't change his equipment, you have 2 sets and can change your equipment from your inventory (in exemple, shield for everyone)
- The AI can't avoid attack of opportunity because they don't have "disengage" as a bonus action (except goblins). Their AOO are useless, yours are powerfull.
- The AI won't ever jump to avoid fire damages if they're on a fire surface, you will.
- The AI won't ever use dash to reach you (i.e if you're higher)
-...
-...

We have TONS of "bonuses" the AI never use. And yes, it also create balance issues whatever we're talking about the bonuses of players or the bonuses of the AI.

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My man, you clearly have not used any of the Larian cheese. If you jump to high ground before every ranged attack and jump behind enemies, you'll be stomping them in no time. And that's without abusing the extremely powerful bonus actions and items that are everywhere, as laid out by Max.

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Originally Posted by Ankou
My man, you clearly have not used any of the Larian cheese. If you jump to high ground before every ranged attack and jump behind enemies, you'll be stomping them in no time. And that's without abusing the extremely powerful bonus actions and items that are everywhere, as laid out by Max.
The cheese makes me feel like an accountant. Jumping behind every enemy and going for high ground every encounter is just as fun as pulling reports every month.

Joined: May 2021
Location: Helsinki
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Joined: May 2021
Location: Helsinki
Originally Posted by Chief_Jericho
I swing a sword almost as long as I am tall, it comes crashing down on their head doing a monstrous... 1 damage

Except you can't deal 1 damage with a greatsword unless you have negative strength modifier (or resistance).

Originally Posted by Chief_Jericho
If I want to build a tank I should be able to take points out of dexterity and sink them into strength and constitution. I can't.

Why can't you do that?

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